How the Political Parties are registered (#GS II)

Context:

  • Under Section 29A of the Representation of the People Act, 1951, Captain Amarinder Singh has filed an application with the Election Commission to create his new political party, the Punjab Lok Congress Party.

What’s the process:

  • According to the Election Commission, any political party seeking registration must file an application within 30 days of its formation.
  • The Commission issued these directions in the exercise of the powers conferred on it by Article 324 of the Constitution and Section 29A of the Representation of the People Act, 1951.
  • Political parties are required to be registered.
  • The registration of political parties is governed by Section 29A of the Representation of the People Act, 1951.
  • A party seeking registration with the Election Commission under Section 29A of the Representation of the People Act, 1951, must file an application with the Commission within the time period specified after its formation, following the guidelines prescribed by the Election Commission of India in exercising the powers conferred by Article 324 of the Commission of India and Section 29A of the Representation of the People Act, 1951.

Guidelines:

  • According to the existing standards, the applicant must publish the proposed name of the party in two national newspapers and two local dailies.
  • It also gives the public two days to raise any objections to the party's proposed registration with the Commission within 30 days of its publication.
  • The notice of publication is also accessible on the Election Commission's website.

One must meet the following conditions to become a 'National Political Party of India.':

  • It earns at least 6% of the legitimate votes voted in any four or more states in a general election for the House of People or the State Legislative Assembly.
  • It must also secure at least four seats in the House of People from any state or states.
  • It receives at least 2% of the seats in the House of People (11 out of 543 total), and these members are elected from at least three different states.

One must meet the following conditions to be eligible to become a 'State Political Party.':

  • It receives at least 6% of the valid votes cast in a general election in the State, whether for the House of the People or the State's Legislative Assembly.
  • It was also elected to at least two seats in the Legislative Assembly of the State.
  • It must win at least 3% (3%) of the total number of members in the State's Legislative Assembly, or three seats, whichever is greater.

Benefits:

  • If a party is recognized as a 'State Party,' it is entitled to exclusive allotment of its reserved symbol to candidates it creates in the State in which it is recognized, and if a party is recognized as a 'National Party,' it is entitled to exclusive allotment of its reserved symbol to candidates it creates throughout India.
  • During general elections, recognized 'State' and 'National' parties are entitled to two sets of electoral rolls free of charge at the time of roll revision, as well as one copy of the electoral roll free of charge; they also have access to broadcast/telecast services via Akashvani/Doordarshan.
  • The travel expenses of celebrity campaigners are not to be included in the election expense records of their political party's candidates.

Preliminary Exam Hot-Link:

  • Political parties must be registered.
  • Recognized Political Parties vs. Unrecognized Political Parties
  • State-level parties vs. national-level parties
  • Benefits are available to political parties with a proven track record of accomplishment.
  • What distinguishes a star campaigner?
  • Article 324 of the Indian Constitution.
  • Section 29A of the RPA 1951.

Source : India Today.

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